The last piece in Kauffmann's "Harmonische Seelenlust" is actually composed by Johann Gottfried Walther. Kauffmann died before he could complete the entire collection. That's perhaps the reason why his wife included four works not by Kauffmann's hand. So, to finish the transcription, recording and publication of all chorale preludes by.

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The last piece from the "Harmonische Seelenlust" that was composed by Kauffmann is a prelude to "Ach Gott und Herr". Obviously not meant as a grande finale to the collection, it is (again) a relatively simple fuga on the first notes of the chorale melody. The last entry of the.

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The last few chorale preludes from Kauffmann's "Harmonische Seelenlust" all have the same form of a fugato on the first phrase of the chorale melody. They show that Kauffmann had a firm grip of counterpoint: he has no trouble to use a chorale melody as a bass voice. The recording.

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Kauffmann's prelude to "Wenn wir in höchsten Nöthen sein" is again a fugato with the first phrase of the chorale melody as theme. Though notated on two staves, Kauffmann indicate two entries of the theme with "Ped." so there is no doubt the pedals should be used in this piece..

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Kauffmann's prelude to "Aus tiefer Noth schrei ich zu dir" is largely a manualiter piece. Setup as a fugato on the first phrase of the choral melody, the last entry of the theme is marked with "Ped." in the source. A well written unpretentious piece. The recording was done on.

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The source for most of the Kauffmann pieces is the original edition of 1733 of the "Harmonische Seelenlust". Some of the pieces can also be found in the manuscripts of Johann Gottfried Walther. The prelude to "Jesus Christus, unser Heiland" is one of those. I published the Walther version in.

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Kauffmann's prelude to "Christe, du Lamm Gottes" is another example of using a chorale melody as a bass line, to create a little trio for organ. The upper voices introduce each phrase of the choral melody with short imitations and play and accompaniment that is nothing more than tha harmonies.

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Kauffmann's prelude to "Was mein Gott will" is his most rhapsodic or improvisatory prelude. Four different ideas, from fast trio writing to adagio four part choral writing, make up the prelude. Perhaps meant as depiction of the text of the choral? Or perhaps Kauffmann just wasn't very inspired to.

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Johan Adolph Scheibe wrote at least three Triosonates. I published the first more than two years ago and the second one and a half year ago. Today it's time for the third and last one, the Triosonate in D major. It has three movements in the familiar order.

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Kauffmann's prelude to "Christus der uns selig macht" is a is a simple yet effective bicinium. The soprano voice plays the chorale melody, the other voice plays an accompaniment based on motives from the chorale melody. The left hand part is notated in the source in using the alto clef..

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Kauffmann's prelude to "Wär Gott nicht mit uns dieser Zeit" is written like a Trio for organ, with the choral melody as bass voice. The other two voice introduce each phrase of the choral melody with short imitations. To my ears the character of the piece is far more intimate.

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Kauffmann's prelude to "Nun lasst uns Gott den Herrn" is very much like some of the chorale preludes by Johann Michael Bach and Johann Pachelbell. Solemn in character, with craftmanshiplike voice leading, it features the chorale melody in the bass voice. Kauffmann gives no registration prescription, so it is a.

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Kauffmann's prelude to "Warum betrübst du dich, mein Herz" is a slow paced three part piece. Kauffmann prescribes both Cornet and Sesquialetra for the choral melody. Obviously he wanted to make sure it stands out well from the other two voices. The recording was done on the sample set of.

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Kauffmann's “Harmonische Seelenlust” contains six chorale preludes for the combination of organ and oboe. The oboe plays the chorale melody, while the organ plays and accompanying Trio. This prelude to "Du, o cschönes Weltgebäude" is the sixth and last of these works. Again, Kauffmann shows his talent for intricate trio.

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Kauffmann's chorale prelude to "Alle Menschen müssen sterben" is a bicinium, with the choral melody in the right hand part, accompanied by rapid notes in the left hand part. Kauffmann does not give a registration for this piece. In other similar pieces Kauffmann prescribes the use of a Fagott 16',.

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