This piece is also known as "Ricercar pro tempore adventus". The text of the choral venerates Maria as the mother of Christ. Fischer creates a great fugue on the first segment of the melody of this choral. He writes music of such natural flowing beauty, that you have to.

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It is well known that Johann Sebastian Bach considered Johann Ludwig Krebs as his most talented student. To Krebs Bach was undoubtedly a great source of inspiration. Many of Krebs's large scale organ works clearly use the works of Bach as a model. The inspiration for Krebs's Prelude and fugue.

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After yesterday's prelude that was possibly written by Johann Heinrich Buttstett, follows today a prelude that was definitely written by Buttstett. The general idea is the same: choral melody in the bass voice and two freely moving voices as accompaniment. Nevertheless, it is a very different piece in texture and.

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The Frankenberg manuscript, held by the Nederlands Muziekinstituut, is a rich source of choral preludes from both named and unnamed composers. This prelude to "Nun freut euch, lieben Christen gemein" is one of those anonymous compositions. It is sometimes ascribed to Johann Heinrich Buttstett. Whoever the composer, he or she.

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Georg Friedrich Kauffmann (1679 - 1735), a German composer and organist, is the autor of the "Harmonische Seelenlust". This work, containing all of his known chorale preludes together with figured bass settings for all but one of the used chorale melodies, was first initiated by Kauffmann as a serial publication..

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Jacob Adlung (1699 - 1762) was a German organist, teacher, instrument maker, music historian, and music theorist. He was born in Bindersleben, near Erfurt. He studied philosophy, philology, and theology at the University of Jena from 1723 to 1726, where he studied the organ further with Johann Nikolaus Bach. He.

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Pachelbel's prelude to "Herr Christ, der einig Gottes Sohn" has the choral melody in the bass. The upper two voices play a free, fast moving accompaniment, with short segments of fore imitation. There is another prelude by Pachelbel based on the same choral melody that has a similar setup (available.

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This chorale prelude is the twin of the one (TWV 31:51) I posted yesterday. Where TWV 31:51 is very 'keyboard' in nature, TWV 31:52 is more instrumental. It is easy to imagine the accompanying notes being played by a basso continuo and an instrument like violin or oboe, while the.

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In this chorale prelude Telemann writes broken chords for the right hand, while the chorale melody is played with the left hand. The festive text of the first verse of this chorale led me initially to play it in a rather high tempo. After that I played it in a.

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Zachow wrote at least four preludes based on the melody of "Vom Himmel hoch da komm ich her". Three can already be found on my site. Today follows the fourth. The chorale melody is played with the right hand, though it might be difficult to discern it. In the rapid.

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Since advent started today, it is time for a few more pieces of music suited for the advent and Christmas period. Perhaps they will come in handy in the many services that are to be played in the coming weeks. Zachow wrote at least four preludes based on the melody.

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Buxtehude's second prelude to "Von Gott will ich nicht lassen", BuxWV 220, is very unlike its twin prelude, BuxWV 220. Where that one is Buxtehude's familiar monodic style, BuxWV 221 is full of grandeur, and elements of the style fantastico. The chorale melody sounds, embellished in the upper voice, as.

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The end of another series is near. Zachow's preludes to "Erbarm dich mein, o Herre Gott" is the last of the Neumeister-choräle-not-by-Johann_Sebastian-Bach left for me to publish. Written in the style antico, it show Zachow's mastery of contrapuntal writing. It's a beautiful piece, as usual with a lot of transcriptional.

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The Neumeister Sammlung contains 5 chorale preludes written by Georg Andreas Sorge, Neumeister’s teacher at the organ. This is the fifth and last one of them. A simple three part setting of "Freu dich sehr, o meine Seele". As always with Sorge, even if the means are simple, the result.

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Buxtehude's prelude to "Von Gott will ich nicht lassen", BuxWV 220, is in his familiar style. The soprano voice plays the choral melody with colourfull embelishments. The other voices accompanythe solo voice with elements and motives from the chorale melody. The score is based on the Frankenberg manuscript. The Frankenberg.

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